Self-help strategies for anxiety

If you feel that your anxiety is affecting your daily life, it’s good to check in with your doctor. There are some physical conditions that can cause anxiety, so ask your doctor for a full physical check-up, if possible, or to check for medical conditions known to cause symptoms of anxiety, such as hyperthyroidism, Vitamin B12 deficiency, or heart irregularities.

Once you’ve been reassured that there’s no physiological cause, there are many ways you can help calm the body and the mind. These two work on each other in a two-way system, so you can do things to calm the mind and they will slow down the body’s anxious reactions (this is known as working ‘top down’), or you can work on the body and notice how your mind begins to become more calm (this is known as working ‘bottom up’).

CALMING THE MIND

When we start associating certain things with making us anxious, we begin to avoid them. This is completely natural and ties in to our evolutionary psychology – anxiety is there as a prompt to keep us away from dangerous situations. However, when anxiety becomes a common or everyday state, it comes into play with situations that are not potentially dangerous in terms of our physical safety. And it turns out that avoiding things that make us anxious isn’t a good idea – research has shown that avoidance increases anxiety, rather than lessening it. So someone might start by avoiding large gatherings, then small parties, then even an outing with close friends, because the avoidance has fostered a sense of anxiety in ever-smaller situations. This means that anxiety is best overcome by facing your fears rather than avoiding them, and the earlier this is done, the easier it is to ease any anxiety that has become associated with particular things, people or events. No one needs to do this on their own, so be sure to seek professional help if this feels right for you.

Here are some other ways for calming the mind:

  • Mindfulness has proved to be especially useful as a way to ease anxiety both short- and long-term, so you might want to consider using a mindfulness app (such as Headspace) or website (I like AudioDharma.org but there are lots more to choose from). The Oxford Mindfulness Centre – home of mindfulness-based CBT – has lots of resources, including a great three-minute ‘Breathing-space Meditation’ to calm the mind and body – click here to listen now.
  • See your anxious thoughts as guesses, not facts. Your mind is trying to predict what might happen, but it might be wildly out! Are you basing your predictions on what happened in exactly the same situation in the past? And if so, how likely is it that every factor will be exactly the same? (The philosopher Heraclitus famously said that “we never step into the same river twice”.)
  • Remember that just as our muscles are there to allow us to stretch and move, the brain is there to produce thoughts. Some of these are useful, and some are less so, while others are not useful at all. Spend some time when you’re not anxious just noticing some of the thoughts that arise in your mind. Perhaps think of them as clouds passing by, in front of your awareness – you can pick one or two up, or choose to let them all just float on by. There’s no need to act or even react to our thoughts – noticing them in a detached way allows us time to evaluate their usefulness and respond with choice.
  • Be aware that the mind can also make up whole stories, especially about ourselves (perhaps that we are unlovable or worthless or ‘stupid’). These messages are likely to have evolved from past experiences, and do not necessarily bear any relation to any truths about ourselves. If you have had difficult relationships in the past – with family members, friends or work colleagues, for instance – it’s possible that you’ve picked up faulty information (this is a useful area to explore in counselling). Notice any thoughts or stories like this and allow them to float on by. If they’re ‘sticky’, write them down or draw something that represents them. That way they have been expressed, and you can always come back to them later.
  • Broaden the picture. It’s possible to become very drawn to one particular aspect of a situation and become scared by that. Broaden your view, so that when you consider the situation again, it’s just one part of a much larger picture in your mind. If you like, you can ‘zoom out’ all the way to a satellite view of earth. Or imagine how you’ll think about this situation in 10 years’ time. Give yourself more distance, either geographically or in time. How big does the problem seem now?
  • Stay in the present. Look around you now, and notice the colours, sounds and shapes. What’s moving? What’s still? Are there any smells? Is any part of your body touching the ground or a piece of furniture? How is it, being in this body, today, here and now?

CALMING THE BODY

Here are a few effective ways of calming the body (the mind will follow!)

  • Reduce caffeine intake to 300 mg or less per day (that’s two cups of filtered coffee or three cups of instant)
  • Do some physical exercise every day for at least 30 minutes (even a brisk walk will do, but a run is even better)
  • Spend time doing things you love – make sure you’ve got room in your weekly schedule for fun stuff
  • Practise breathing exercises when you’re feeling anxious and just at occasional times during the day. Breathe gently in, drawing the breath down to your lower abdomen (as though you’re blowing up a balloon in your belly), hold the breath for a count of three, and then gently breathe out of your mouth as slowly as possible. Try to make the out-breath at least twice as long as the in-breath. Don’t gulp in the air, because that can cause the physical symptoms of panic. Take it slow, and focus on the slow out-breath. Repeat at least three times whenever you want to calm the mind and body.
  • Everyone has personal favourites (or ‘tools’) too, which they can use to restore balance to the body and mind, such as music, reading, dancing or swimming.

Lastly, it may be that anxiety has a unique meaning for you and actually does ‘make sense’ in a way that you haven’t yet realised. Once this is known, you have a very powerful way of reducing anxiety or even banishing it forever. I’ll look at this in my next post.

As always, thanks for reading.

Sarah Tomley is a counsellor working in Suffolk, UK (www.insightcounsellingipswich.com)

One thought on “Self-help strategies for anxiety

  1. Thank you Sarah I always forget that my mind makes up its own stories. I find your tips on staying present, checking out where I really am very helpful. with love Mary

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